What Are Normal Baby Sleeping Habits?

 

Baby asleep

Both new and experienced parents need to be familiar with normal sleeping habits for their baby, and be able to differentiate when there may be a health concern. Also, parents should be trained in infant and adult CPR in case of an emergency, as well as first aid. Knowing what’s normal and what isn’t will help you spot problems right away. You need to be aware of your baby’s breathing patterns during sleep and keep in mind that when babies sleep it won’t always be peaceful.

There may be kicking, groaning, whimpering and other noises that your baby makes which can be a source of concern but are mostly normal behaviors. There are other behaviors such as head banging, teeth grinding, or rocking that can seem even more concerning but are also mostly normal behaviors. Head banging is a habit where babies bang their forehead or the back of their head on their crib headboard. In spite of how concern this habit is, parents don’t need to be worried about it, although it should be brought up to the baby’s pediatrician just to be certain.

Be aware of changes in breathing patterns

The above mentioned sleeping habits are usually not a point of concern, but parents do need to be aware of their baby’s breathing patterns and catch any signs of abnormalities. The rhythm of your baby’s breathing can change throughout the night; she may breath rapidly and then pause for up to 10 to 15 seconds before breathing normally again.

If this happens you should remain calm, as this type of breathing is called periodic breathing and is common in many babies up to the age of 6 months. This breathing pattern only happens about 5 percent of the time during the evening. Premature babies can show periodic breathing up to 10 percent of the time, and your pediatrician should advise you on particular issues you may need to be cautious about if your baby was born premature. If you see periodic breathing happen more often or if your baby is continuing this breathing pattern after 6 months you should speak to your physician.

 

What to do when you are concerned about your baby’s breathing

If you are ever concerned that your baby has stopped breathing, nudge her to see if there is a response. If there is no response there may be an emergency or an episode of apnea. Immediately start administering CPR, and be certain that your baby has stopped breathing before administering infant CPR. If you are alone, administer CPR for two minutes then call emergency services and resume CPR as soon as possible until help arrives or until your baby begins breathing again.

If there are two people present have one person call emergency services while the person who is best trained in infant CPR should perform CPR. In some cases your baby may have had an apparent life threatening event (ALTE) which would need further diagnoses by your medical doctor to pinpoint the condition and prevent it in the future. Always be sure to place your baby on her back for sleeping to ensure that breathing is as easy as possible.

Read More

9 Hours SUPER RELAXING BABY MUSIC

9 Hours SUPER RELAXING BABY MUSIC

<div align="center"><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><script async src="//pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/js/adsbygoogle.js"></script><!-- [et_pb_line_break_holder] --><!-- Large Leaderboard BBL Post --><!--...

Sleep Training Methods You Should Never Use Them!

Sleep Training Methods You Should Never Use Them!

  Every one wants a simple system that works and baby sleep is no different. Some so called baby sleep 'experts' exploit this human need and come up with 'systems' and methods for baby sleep which they can sell to us as the way to solve all our...

Why You Should Play Music To Your Baby

Why You Should Play Music To Your Baby

Music  is everywhere. It is felt in bird chants to rain drops and in guitar strings to drum beats. Different type of music has a different impact on humans like some soothe up our minds,

Join The Discussion

Baby asleep

Both new and experienced parents need to be familiar with normal sleeping habits for their baby, and be able to differentiate when there may be a health concern. Also, parents should be trained in infant and adult CPR in case of an emergency, as well as first aid. Knowing what’s normal and what isn’t will help you spot problems right away. You need to be aware of your baby’s breathing patterns during sleep and keep in mind that when babies sleep it won’t always be peaceful.

There may be kicking, groaning, whimpering and other noises that your baby makes which can be a source of concern but are mostly normal behaviors. There are other behaviors such as head banging, teeth grinding, or rocking that can seem even more concerning but are also mostly normal behaviors. Head banging is a habit where babies bang their forehead or the back of their head on their crib headboard. In spite of how concern this habit is, parents don’t need to be worried about it, although it should be brought up to the baby’s pediatrician just to be certain.

Be aware of changes in breathing patterns

The above mentioned sleeping habits are usually not a point of concern, but parents do need to be aware of their baby’s breathing patterns and catch any signs of abnormalities. The rhythm of your baby’s breathing can change throughout the night; she may breath rapidly and then pause for up to 10 to 15 seconds before breathing normally again.

If this happens you should remain calm, as this type of breathing is called periodic breathing and is common in many babies up to the age of 6 months. This breathing pattern only happens about 5 percent of the time during the evening. Premature babies can show periodic breathing up to 10 percent of the time, and your pediatrician should advise you on particular issues you may need to be cautious about if your baby was born premature. If you see periodic breathing happen more often or if your baby is continuing this breathing pattern after 6 months you should speak to your physician.

What to do when you are concerned about your baby’s breathing

If you are ever concerned that your baby has stopped breathing, nudge her to see if there is a response. If there is no response there may be an emergency or an episode of apnea. Immediately start administering CPR, and be certain that your baby has stopped breathing before administering infant CPR. If you are alone, administer CPR for two minutes then call emergency services and resume CPR as soon as possible until help arrives or until your baby begins breathing again.

If there are two people present have one person call emergency services while the person who is best trained in infant CPR should perform CPR. In some cases your baby may have had an apparent life threatening event (ALTE) which would need further diagnoses by your medical doctor to pinpoint the condition and prevent it in the future. Always be sure to place your baby on her back for sleeping to ensure that breathing is as easy as possible.